Tuesday, December 15, 2015

Last Exploration Natalee Christman

I really enjoyed “The Ideal of a Local Economy” by Wendell Berry. One aspect of the writing I enjoyed was when he referenced the fact that our way of life has become like leisure. In a quote from the reading he says “we have an environmental crisis because we have consented to an economy in which by eating, drinking, working, resting, traveling, and enjoying we are destroying the natural, the god given world” (Berry,14). I found this quote to be the most influential because he is calling our culture out as a whole. He is saying that the lifestyle we are living we are destroying our environment and even the natural world. I agree with what Jessica had to say about Berry’s stance on humans. Berry pretty much is saying is that humans do not rely on themselves anymore. They rely on other people and large corporations for basic necessities for life. I really did enjoy the Wendell Berry because it brought to light how the American culture is not self sufficient and we rely on only a couple companies for necessities. 
An aspect of culture that we do not recognize is the drug problem that this nation is facing a a whole. I know that recently I watched a special on 60 minutes that was over the heroin problem in Ohio. The episode took place in suburbs around Columbus. I think that this is an issue that we need to talk more about because it is not a drug that only a certain group of people use. In this episode most of the people using were teenagers who lived in well off suburbs. I found this intriguing because when I think of people who are drug abusers I think of people who are impoverished. This was scary to me because I began to think that friends or people I know could be using. It also amazes me the number of people who wanted the marijuana bill to pass, but I am glad it did not. I feel that marijuana is not as dangerous as heroin, but may increase the chances of somebody doing heroin. Before I watched this special I knew that heroin was a drug, but what I did not realize that for a lot of users heroin was not the first drug they had done. Many of them admitted to using cocaine and prescription pills. Overall I think that this is an issue that needs to be discussed in our culture more because it is killing America’s youth. Here is a link to the 60 minute special http://www.cbsnews.com/videos/heroin-in-the-heartland/


Last Exploration from Chas Jones

     Wendell Berry's essay, "The Idea of a Local Economy" was very interesting to read. This is because Berry's writing style and diction are very complex. Its not that he leaves the reader to interpret for themselves but the facts and information he gives the reader really makes the reader think about the possibilities. That is the main reason I found this essay interesting , is because the thinking it makes us do. A quote that I found complex is, "The "environmental crisis" has happened because the human household or economy is in conflict at almost every point with the household of nature." I found this quote to be complicated because Berry makes the problem seem and sound so simple but the answers are quite complex for the average American to understand. I believe the problem with this essay is there are unlimited questions and problems that need answers but there is a limited amount of answers.
    I agree with Rachael's statement on Berry's quote of competition being war. I agree with her on the basis of completion bringing out the best of us but I also agree with Berry's interpretation of competition but with a different meaning. I also believe that competition is similar to war. Berry uses this negatively but I try to make a positive out of this and that is that war always gives us an answer. Yes, there is a lot of destruction during war but in the end the best man always comes out on top. Also war will always give us more answers than questions.
     I am very passionate about the sport of baseball. I believe that in all sports you can learn valuable life lessons but I think baseball is different than all other sports. Baseball is a dying sport which is a shame. It is now known as Americas past time instead of like football being the present and the future of sports. It is well known as being a "boring" sport to watch and to play. This is the main reason why baseball is dying in America. Baseball represents everything that made America great. Yes it is a "slow" sport for modern fast paced America but that is what it teaches us. Good things come with patients, which sounds dumb in this fast paced, we need it now, world. Also in baseball there in no running out the clock because there is no clock. In football and basketball you can waste clock and not give the ball back to the opponent which I believe is to easy. In baseball you have to throw the next pitch, you can't just say "we are up by a run so I"m not gonna let the other team have a chance to hit." You can't do that, you have to finish the game strong and that is also why no team is ever out of it. Just like in life, no matter what, you still have hope and can still be successful.

Thursday, December 10, 2015

Last Exploration: Jared Gandelot

I enjoyed reading "The Idea of a Local Economy"; I liked how Berry broke down the "environmental crisis" from a socio-economic one, to one that can only be solved by individuals and their communities. On page 14, Berry explains that the issue at hand can only be solved if people take responsibility back from the corporation that are doing no good, for humanity and the environment.
   "If people began the effort to take back into their own power a significant portion of their economic responsibility, then their inevitable first discovery is that the "environmental crisis" is no such thing; it is not a crisis of our environs or surroundings; it is a crisis of our lives as individuals, as family members, as community members and as citizens."
I agree with him on the fact that it is a crisis of the individual, I don't agree on how he uses quotations around environmental crisis. I understand he is trying to make a point but I feel like he is ignoring the seriousness of  the issue. As he continues he list the assumptions of a "free market", I like how he states all of the problems before giving his solution. The  clarity in his writing is what makes this essay so readable.
I liked how Alan used the sheep and shepherd metaphor to explain how the free market is dangerous. "...the global economy is shepherding people into a system that is hurting the world and those that run it are stuck in an unending loop that they may want to get out of, but have no way of doing so."

One issue that I feel does not get talked about enough is the rate at which species around the world are going extinct. We are witnessing a mass extinction caused by our need of and consumption of natural resources. The current extinction levels are 114 times higher than natural levels. Levels that high have not been seen for 65 million years, that was when the dinosaurs went extinct. There is hope though, if radical changes are made to the way we live and conservation efforts grow exponentially we can slow it down. If nothing is done we will "sink with the ship", last time I checked, Earth doesn't have a life boat.

Last Exploration- Brianna Moore

In "The Idea of Local Economy" by Wendell Berry he talked a lot about how with the "environmental crisis" a lot of the people even if they do know about the problem they still ignore it, in order to help themselves feel better! "We can't hope to solve these problems without an increase of public awareness and concern." This is saying that if people don't care about the issue and are not aware of it that it will never go away. It seems that people are so obsessed with the idea of having everything that they want right now, so much that they fear inconvenience and will eventually lead the world to ruins. Today's society is all about now now now, but instead we should be looking at the things that our fear of inconvenience causes us. Like Ruksana said in her exploration that it’s so hard to enact widespread change in the current economy we live in, we want to do better but we don't necessarily know how to improve what we are doing.

An issue in today's society is world hunger, I mean as American's we waste and throw away so much food when there are third world countries with starving children who are not able to have the proper diet in order to survive and most of these children die from starvation. 

Last Exploration: Elizabeth Scott

     One thing I found particularly interesting in the article was when it talked about how to keep the cost of labor low. On page 18 of the article, they wrote " In this way it is possible to maintain a "pool" of people who are in the threatening position of being mere consumers, landless and also poor, and who therefore are eager to go to work for low wages - precisely the condition of the migrant farm workers in the United States." I thought this was interesting because I feel like it really relates to today's society - in specific, the young adult generation of today. Many young adults today are living on their own, with children and a family already at such a young age, and struggle to keep on top of everything. They are then forced into jobs making minimum wage or barely above that just to provide food for their kids and families and to pay the bills. I just found this interesting because even though the author of the article was talking about the farm workers, I also can see this being portrayed in today's culture.

     One thing that I think isn't really given much attention at all and is particularly relevant in today's younger population is issues of self-image. I think so many people today, girls in particular, are prone to being unhappy with themselves and how they look. Thin, perfect looking celebrities and things like the "Victoria's Secret Fashion Show" that was a few nights ago result in younger people feeling insecure about themselves. I saw several posts on social media saying things like "time to watch the VS Fashion Show and cry because I'll never look like them [insert a million crying emojis]" and other negative things like that and I think it's a huge HUGE issue. So many young people focus on wanting to look like or be like someone else instead of being happy with themselves or focusing on good things. I feel somewhat strongly about this because I used to be the same way until I actually did something about it and started going to the gym a lot. Some people may occasionally tell me I look "manly" or that I shouldn't get "too big" or "too muscular" but I have learned to ignore what people say and do what makes me happier with myself and happier in general. I'd rather have muscles bigger than other girls my age (and some guys my age as well) and go to the gym and lifting heavy weight instead of just running so I look "thin" enough to fit in with today's view of what is attractive. If that's what makes me feel better, that's what I'm going to do.  I think more people should do the same. By this I mean not necessarily lifting weights unless that's what they're interested in, but ignoring what society tells them about how they should look or what is attractive or how they should act and instead focusing on being how they want to be - not how everyone else wants them to be. 

Last Exploration- Rachel Hopper

       One thing that I found intriguing in the reading was Berry's idea that competition is a form of war.  The reason I find this interesting is because I think competition in the economy is very helpful.  I do agree with him that smaller economies are much more ideal and that they should be less institutionalized.  I found that this quote really captured my attention:

     "The law of competition is a simple paradox: Competition destroys competition.  The law of competition implies that many competitors, competing without restraint, will ultimately and inevitably reduce the number of competitors to one.  The law of competition, in short, is the law of war."

     Something else that I was reminded of is the recurring theme in our class: people today are obsessed with efficiency and convenience.  This theme has came up in the Fresh documentary that we watched in class, as well as the class discussing the excessive cell phone use issue.  Efficiency and convenience could become our own worst enemy if we let it.   
     One thing that I think could be talked about more is expanding our horizons and trying to break out of our comfort zones. There are many ways to do this.  You could read more or something that is different from what you would normally read.  Maybe go see a performance of some sort or try an activity that you normally don't find yourself doing that often or at all even.  I feel that having different experiences is how life is meant to be lived: to try new things and appreciate the little things.  It could be a learning experience.  You could possibly gain a skill. Or you could just be doing something just so you can say that you did it.  I feel like everyone could always break out of their comfort zone a little more.

Exploration 8 - Alan Brophy

The Idea of a Local Economy by Wendell Berry is an eye opening read that shows the view of the economy from someone who has decided not to be a sheep to the Shepard of corporate greed. I like Jireh White's comment on how blunt Berry was in his article and the fact he can be considered offensive as he is defending the ideals of localization of the economy. Berry attacks corporations, but not necessarily the people running them, because he states, "I don't mean to say, of course, that all corporate executives and stockholders are bad people. I am only saying that all of them are very seriously implicated in a bad economy." I took this as the global economy is shepherding people into a system that is hurting the world and those that run it are stuck in an unending loop that they may want to get out of, but have no way of doing so. I think that Berry is right in saying that local economies should only export their surplus, but that is not how the world works currently. The global economy works as such: make for less, and sell for more. This is not a healthy way of going about business.

I think that we should have talked more about alternative energy in the classroom if we even did talk about it. Personally alternatives to fossil fuels need to be discovered for us to be able to sustain our culture and more ahead. Fossil fuels are non-renewable resources and also hurt the environment quite a bit. Although, since the efficiency of wind farms and solar farms are way too low for being cost effective, that is not going to happen in an instant. Nuclear is too expensive for anyone to start to build, and water is too location dependent. Thus I believe more R&D needs to go into alternative energies for us to move on.

Last Exploration by Ruksana Kabealo

In Wendell Berry’s essay “The Idea of a Local Economy” Berry explores the destructive nature of a total economy as well as the method to remedy it: a switch to a local economy. Berry defines a total economy as “one in which everything – ‘life forms,’ for instance, or the ‘right to pollute’ - is ‘private property’ and has a price and is for sale”. Berry describes a local economy as one based on neighborhood and subsistence, in which communities locally produce and exchange as many products needed by their citizens, while taking into account the effects on the environment and the interests of the people.

One of the things I realized while reading the essay was why exactly it’s so hard to enact widespread change in the current economy we live in. We all want to try and do better, but the greatest obstacle in our way is that we don’t necessarily know how. Even in today’s information age, it’s unnaturally hard to find out the true extent of corporate pollution or what the effects of a certain chemical in our foods are. Berry elaborates on this in the essay, describing the situation the consumers in a total economy find themselves in:

Though one is shopping amid an astonishing variety of products, one is denied certain significant choices. In such a state of economic ignorance it is not possible to choose products that were produced locally or with reasonable kindness toward people and toward nature. Nor is it possible for such consumers to influence production for the better [7]

I used to be of the mindset that education regarding the production methods and practices of companies was the problem. I used to believe that corporations themselves weren’t a bad thing, but the amount of secrecy regarding their practices was. However, Berry’s essay has made me consider that maybe the reliance on corporations themselves is the problem. After all, as Berry states, corporations are not people. Corporations lack morality and therefore are extremely unlike to put the interest of the people above the interest of the corporation. Perhaps the solution is not greater required transparency regarding a corporation’s methods, but the reduction of corporate power.

I also agree with Morgan that change goes far beyond complaining or having a change of heart. Every single one of us needs to act on our feelings and do something that will create lasting change, especially if we’re going to do something as drastic as the switch from a total economy to a local economy.

One issue I don’t think we discuss enough in our culture is the sexualization of girls at increasingly younger ages and just how detrimental it is. My younger sister is twelve-years-old. Recently, she was showing me the Instagram profile of one of her friends. In one picture, the girl poses seductively, her lips pouting, her face full of makeup, in a low-cut top. This girl is twelve. 

From the increasingly provocative nature of girls’ Halloween costumes [1] (especially when compared to the same boys’ costumes for the same age ranges [2]), to popular, nationwide clothing lines such as Abercrombie & Fitch marketing push-up bikinis to girls as young as 7-years-old [3], to the drastic increase in girls represented with sexualizing characteristics (for example, tight clothes and high heels) in popular girls’ magazines aimed at girls as young as ten (such as the popular Girls’ Life magazine) from 1970 to 2011 [4], there’s no doubt that young girls are becoming increasingly sexualized over time.

This increasing sexualization has led to a change in the attitudes of young girls. Girls are becoming more self-objectifying and more caught up in their physical appearances. In a recent study conducted on girls from 6 to 9 years old, girls were presented a doll dressed in clothes that were tight and revealing and another doll dressed in clothes that were fashionable but looser and more modest [5]. The girls were then asked which doll looked how they wanted to look, which doll was more popular, and which doll they wanted to play with. The girls overwhelmingly chose the “sexy” doll. 

This sexualization of girls stems from the rampant sexualization of women in the mainstream media and pop culture of the United States. Women are sold the notion that beauty is associated with happiness/popularity/wealth/success and that in order to be beautiful they must look a certain way. This message is everywhere, from film to television to magazines. With the rise of social media and the internet, these messages have become even harder to avoid.  

The idea that women’s sexual appeal is inherently linked to their self-worth is in and of itself an extremely problematic notion. When this notion is marketed to children who don’t quite understand the full implication of the message, by companies looking to expand their audiences to make a profit, it goes beyond far problematic. It’s disgusting and immoral.

Not only that, but it’s been proven that this increased sexualization of girls in the media has negative effects on girls’ mental health. Sexualization in the media leads to increased self-objectification. The American Psychological Association released a report in 2008 called "The Sexualization of Girls", which went into great detail about the negative effects of self-objectification on girls:

Studies also show that self-objectification is associated with negative mental health outcomes in adolescent girls. For example, Tolman et al. (2006) found that in early adolescence, girls who had a more objectified relationship with their bodies were more likely to experience depression and had lower self-esteem. Similarly, Harrison and Fredrickson (2003) reported that among Black and White adolescent girls, self-objectification was a significant predictor of depression, body shame, and disordered eating, even when controlling for race, grade in school, and body mass index [6]

The full APA report is available here, for anyone interested: http://www.apa.org/pi/women/programs/girls/report-full.pdf

It’s a long report, but it really does a fantastic job of both explaining the negative effects of increased sexualization of girls in the media and describing approaches to lessening the influence of sexualization we can all take in our own lives. Honestly, I believe being aware of and knowing how to counteract these influences is vital to anyone with young women in their lives, especially those of us who have younger sisters or those of us who might have daughters someday.

Works Cited:

[1] http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/25/sexy-halloween-costumes-for-girls_n_2011943.html
[3] http://abcnews.go.com/US/abercrombie-fitch-padded-bikini-top-year-olds-parents/story?id=13236904
[4] http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11199-013-0321-0
[7] http://www.cliffarnold.com/localeconomy.pdf



Last Exploration by Catelyn Millet

One idea that stuck out to me in Wendell Berry's essay "The Idea of a Local Economy" is how much people actually play a big part in this. The quote that stuck out to me was "If people begin the effort to take back into their own power a significant portion of their economic responsibility, then their inevitable first discovery is that the "environmental crisis" is no such thing". People just don't realize how much they actually affect the economy. I agree with Jessica in saying that we are basically blind in seeing that we are a major part to the environmental crisis. We just don't want to put the blame on ourselves so we try to come up with other reasons that don't put us in the spotlight. We take advantage of the resources we have. People should focus on helping the environment by planting their own gardens or purchasing their own farm if they're capable of doing so.
One issue that I think we don't talk about enough is babies that are born from a mother that was a drug addict and did drugs while she was pregnant. I watched a short video today on Facebook about babies that are actually born with drug addictions because their mother did drugs while pregnant. It actually says in the video that U.S. laws require hospitals to report this to social services but it hardly ever happens. There's a mom in the video that actually lost her baby because of it. I think we need to spread more awareness about the issue. I think woman need to know what can happen to their child if they do drugs while pregnant. It's not fair to the baby. They don't deserve to be born into the world struggling with an addiction. Here is the link to the video I watched.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tk2hOYUpKVI

Last Exploration Travis Baum

        In the essay "The Idea of a Local Economy", Wendell Berry Strongly believes that a "Local Economy" is the answer to everything. Berry says "what has happened is that most people in our country, and apparently most people in the developed world, have given proxies to the corporations to produce and provide all of their food, clothing, and shelter. Moreover, they are rapidly giving proxies to corporations or governments to provide entertainment, education, child care, care of the sick and the elderly, and many other kinds of "service" that once were carried on informally and inexpensively by individuals or households or communities." What she means by this is that corporations and governments have all the control in todays society and if we start making small changes to limit their control it would help significantly. I agree with Wendell Berry because i too think the government has a bit too much control on things that we can take care of as a community and as families. I agree with Eli about how by making our food market local it will give people more control and then make the product better for you. This will limit corporations and the Governments say in what we eat and goes into the food we eat.


One issue that i believe we should talk more about in our culture is the use of technology and how it is taking over peoples lives. I believe we should talk to the younger generations about the use of cellphones and social media because it is a big problem in todays society and will only get worse as years pass. Ive seen kids that aren't even in the 5th grade yet with iPhones and that just mind boggled me. With the age of kids getting phones becoming younger by the year, i believe the issue of cyber bullying will become more relevant, mindless kids and social media mixed together will never end good.





Last Exploration- Brandon Smith

In The Idea of a Local Economy, Berry states that, "The danger now is that those who are concerned will believe that the solution to the 'environmental crisis' can be merely political." This is not the way to solve this problem. As a country we have seen what has happened when we give the power to the politicians and expect them to help the environment. They fail to do anything with our requests normally. We need to take this problem into our own hands. That is what Berry is trying to get at. He also talks about the oversimplification and how it is a problem and I like how he gives the reader a solution to why the environmental crisis is getting bad and isn't changing. I like how he comes out and tells the reader what he is fighting for and is very blunt about which some people might not like but I think it helps get his point across.

An issue that I think is overlooked is the Emerald Ash Borer problem that the U.S. has. We are looking at a possible wipeout of a tree species that has large numbers in the U.S. or at least it used to. The Ash borers have put a huge dent in the population and it is only getting larger and larger. They can kill an Ash tree in as little as 2-3 years and they have dented the population so much when they were only first detected in Toledo in 2003, and now they are everywhere in Ohio. They live within the bark of the tree and the metallic green and only about a half inch long. They are interesting and dangerous to the billions of Ash trees that Ohio has. I suggest calling if you suspect your tree has them in it so that we can help to stop the spread of this pest.

Last Exploration- Jessica Stafford

     One of the ideas that stuck out to me in Wendell Berry's essay "The Idea of a Local Economy" is when he claims that us humans are basically oblivious that we are one of the main reasons causing the "Environmental crisis." Berry states, "The 'environmental crisis' has happened because the human household or economy is in conflict at almost every point with the household of nature. We have built our household on the assumption that the natural household is simple and can be simply used." Humans are taking advantage of these resources and when they run out then we rely on corporations to produce our food instead of producing locally like we should be to solve the crisis. I agree with this because we as Americans do rely on large corporations for many things and we could be helping the environment and the local economy if we produced more necessities locally.
I agree with what Eli said in his exploration when he said, If we grow more locally people would apply measures of agriculture that is better to the nature of the community because they know what would be best for their individual communities unlike large corporate companies that don't necessarily care for the well being of the community as long as they increase profits and find an efficient way to achieve mass production.
     One issue that can be experienced all around the country is the issue of people not speaking out because they are afraid of possible consequences. For example, in the California shootings a citizen claims to have noticed suspicious activity the night before the shooting but says they didn't inform police because they didn't want to be wrong and seem like they were in everyone's business. One of the shooter's parents even had some suspicion but did not want to criticize a family member. This has also been a case in many of the other shootings that have occurred. People have their suspicions that something is wrong but are afraid to tell someone and be wrong in public. If the person in California who noticed suspicious activity would've said something, maybe the shooting would have been prevented.
 

Wednesday, December 9, 2015

Last Exploration- Jireh White

While I was reading Wendell Berry's essay, my jaw was on the floor from shock but I was also laughing to myself because a lot of what he said was true. I like the fact that he was very blunt with everything he was saying whether it could be slightly offensive or not. One quote that I highly disagreed with was when he said "Communists and capitalists alike, "liberal"  and "conservative" capitalists alike, have needed to replace religion with some form of determinism , so that they can say to their victims, "I am doing this because I can't do otherwise. It is not my fault. It is inevitable." The wonder is how often organized religion has gone along with this lie." I disagree with this because religion has nothing to do with this. Granted, each person has their own set of beliefs that make them who they are but you don't have to be a certain religion to be a morally just person. Vice versa you can be apart of an organized religion and be the most corrupt person in the world. Economics is about  doing what is right, not about what your religion won't allow you to do. I think that Berry  was comparing apples to oranges and blew this point out of proportion. However, I found a lot of what he said to be true and I think he had a lot of other valid points.
In Morgan's exploration, I liked how she emphasized that a lot of people have a change of heart and want to do something but never really take action. I find this true in a lot of situations in life. People sometimes fail to realize that their intentions isn't what makes the difference but the actual work behind it does. We all see an issue but no one knows what is stopping us from doing something about it.


One thing that we don't talk about enough is good things that go on in the world and even in our own communities. We have all watched the news where they talk about depressing things like shootings, bombings, government corruption etc for an hour and maybe mention one slightly positive thing for one minute. I understand that the news is meant to inform the public about things that are happening but they don't shed light on good things that are also happening. They spend too much time and energy on the bad when we should be focusing on the good. Quite honestly I personally don't watch the news anymore because its depressing hearing all the bad things that happen when there are so many amazing people doing amazing things. I think that if they had a lot more positive news stories it could help people be encouraged and inspired instead of being discouraged by all the bad things. Even if the upbeat stories aren't about some huge movement I think that in this case its the little things that could mean most especially when its close to home and you can help make a difference.

Tuesday, December 8, 2015

Last Exploration: Morgan DeWitt

While reading Wendell Berry's essay, In the Presence of Fear, I found myself taken aback by a lot of points he made. What really made me think the most was a point he made in the very start of the essay, "People will think that they have made a sufficient change if they have altered their "values" or had a "change in heart" or experienced a "spiritual awakening" and that such a change in passive consumers will cause appropriate changes in the public experts, politicians, and corporate executives to whom they have granted their political and economic proxies." This made me think for awhile because it so true. People all the time complain about problems they see in the world and read articles and watch videos that make them feel differently but they never do anything about the change inside of them. The problem is that a feeling is not going to change anything. People need to start acting when they have a change of heart. When someone sees something they don't like, they should change it, not just think about it.
To focus on the environmental issues Wendell Berry discusses, I read Eli's exploration and his focus on a local economy. I think seeing more local food industry pop up around us would be a beautiful thing. It would be healthy for our environment, healthy for our economy, and healthy for us. So why aren't we acting upon this?


My major is Pre-Law with a focus of Environmental Policy and Decision Making. I did a lot of research this year on the dying bat population which is something I'm very passionate about. The bat population has decreased by 80%  in America and hardly any Americans knows about it. I think this a huge cultural issue. The dying bats have created a huge problem in the agriculture industry because of the fact that bats are responsible for eating thousands of tons of insects every night and a recent study showed that losing the bat population could result in billions of dollars in increased pesticide costs and agricultural damages each year. Farmers have nick named bats their "pest control crew" and the bats are worth $74 per acre. The pesticides farmers use in places of bats in turn make our food unhealthy. So it really is a problem for us for people that are ignoring the fact these beautiful creatures are dying. Below is an info graph from the white nose syndrome explaining the disease that is killing the bats. As of right now, there is no cure for white nose syndrome but you can read more about it on whitenosesyndrome.org.

Last exploration Eli Kuntupis

In The Idea of a Local Economy, Berry emphasizes that people should take action to enforce a local economy. A way of starting a local economy is to start with the food market, Berry claims. By making the food industry local it gives people more control over the product which in return will make the product better for you. Also the people would apply measures of agriculture that is better to the nature of the community because they are present in their community unlike large corporate companies that don't necessarily care for the well being of the community as long as they increase profits.

An issue that I think is a problem in our day of age that we don't talk enough about is how easily people get offended by others especially when others state their opinions or beliefs. One example of this recently is how Starbucks changed their cups for the holiday season. Starbucks changed their cups to the color red. This outraged many people. Those offended claimed that it was rude to those that celebrate Hanukkah, others had a problem saying that it didn't associate enough with christmas and thought that it was rude of starbucks to not mention a "merry christmas" or something along those lines on the cup. Some people that were offended try to boycott starbucks. In my opinion this is just laughable. If you are going to get offended by a solid red cup and you become that outraged to where you want to ruin their business i disagree with it but i still respect their choice and know thats just their opinion. What i don't like is how those people that were offended attacked starbucks based on Starbuck's views. I think that everyone is entitled to an opinion and you can disagree with an opinion but that doesn't mean their opinion is wrong. I think thats a big issue in todays society.

Comments for Mason and Brandon: Teddy Roosevelt

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Comments for Ruksana and Brianna: Andy Warhol

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Comments for Catelyn and Kiaya: Misty Copeland

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Thursday, December 3, 2015

Comments for Darrin: 9-11 Memorial object and event

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Comments for Rachel and Elizabeth: Hiroshima bombing event

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Comments for Morgan and Tanner: object St. Louis Arch

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Comments for Andy and Brady: object M-16 rifle

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Tuesday, December 1, 2015

Comments for Alan and Jared: Apple II computer object

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Comments for Natalee and Jessica: Jesse Owens

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Comments for Chas and Travis: Super Bowl event

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Comments for Jirah and NIck: Georgia O'Keefe

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Exploration 7 : Ain't Scared of your Jails - Alan Brophy

I learned that you should not use violence as a means to an end when it comes to fighting for basic human rights. I believe that the documentary was meant to show how you can accomplish great things as a coherent group passively. The African Americans of the time were aiming to open people's eyes to see the violence they took as a culture and aimed to breakthrough to people's hearts. We should use this in the fight against morally wrong issues in today's society. We can link this to many topics today that cause a divide in the American people. Such as abortion, stem cell research, doctor assisted suicide and more.

Quotes:
"I could not agree that it was morally right for someone to sell the merchandise and refuse them service."  Ben West said this because he was asked if he thought it was wrong to discriminate against his race or color. This shows how good and honest of a politician he is. Today we should be given the respect to have our politicians like this.
"It hurt Pee Wee more than it hurt me." Frederick Leonard said this because Pee Wee had to beat him up to take his mattress from him. Pee Wee was a fellow inmate and he hurt more because he didn't want to do it.

Fact:
When the sit ins started, there were now incidents for the first 2 weeks that they were going on. This was because the African Americans were not taken seriously.

One effective tactic was the freedom rides and the riders, because it mad the federal government see what was actually going on. Then, since the freedom rides had to do with the federal transportation, the federal government could take some action and put laws in place. When JFK was able to act on the safety of the freedom riders he did and made sure the National Guard were to protect the freedom riders.

Exploration 7: Elizabeth Scott

     The main thing I learned by watching the documentary was how much pain and suffering had to be done and how many people had to sacrifice their safety in order for things to be how they are today. Today, segregation does not exist like it did in the 50s and 60s. Members of different races can sit in the same seats, shop in the same places, and get the same jobs. This is the case because of how much the students in the Civil Rights movement went through. I was not aware of how much pain, physically and mentally, they had to go through in order to make a change. I was not aware of how brave they were.
     They knew what was coming to them as a result of their actions, but they did it anyway. Frederick Leonard, one of the freedom riders, said the following regarding getting off the bus at one of the stops on the Freedom Rides. "And then all of a sudden, just like magic. White people, sticks and bricks, they're going, "Kill the niggers." We were still on the bus, you know? But I think we're all kind of deciding, "Well, maybe we should go off the back of this bus." Because we kind of knew that if we had gone off the back of the bus, then maybe they wouldn't be so bad on us. They wanted us to go off the back of the bus. And we decided no, no, we'll go off the front and take what's coming to us. We went out the front of the bus." This quote shows that they were very well aware of the consequences and they knew they were going to get hurt, but they were so driven to make a change that they didn't care. They risked their safety for the sole purpose of fighting segregation.
     One thing that surprised me was that it wasn't just those being discriminated against that were participating in the movement. I knew some whites also helped, but I didn't realize they risked theirsafety as well. An example of this is Jim Zwerg, who was participating in the Freedom Rides. Zwerg, in an interview after getting beaten at the same stop Frederick Leonard commented on above, said "Those of us who are on the Freedom Ride, we will continue the Freedom Ride. I'm not sure that I'll be able to, but we're going on to New Orleans no matter what happens. We're dedicated to this, we'll take hitting, we'll take beating. We're willing to accept death. But we're going to keep coming until we can ride from anywhere in the South to any place else in the South without anybody making any comments, just as American citizens." Like Leonard, Zwerg knew he was risking his life for the movement and it didn't stop him. Being white, especially, they risked their safety the most because the people who were anti-segregation were the most enrages by those of their own race who were supporting the other side.
     The first tactic used in the movement was the aforementioned Freedom Ride. I think this was very effective because the willingness of the students to take beating and to keep going allowed for the movement to continue. If they would have given up, the movement would have reached a halt.

Exploration 7: Ain't Scared Of Your Jail

The biggest thing I took away from this documentary is that change at first is always slow and difficult, but once change begins to happen, it really is something to be reckoned with. Change empowers people and allows them to be heard, which in many countries isn't possible, so we should appreciate our democratic system, and try to let everyone's voice be heard.
Watching this documentary showed us that some problems must be handled immediately and directly, because there's no way to ignore some of them. If you ignore them, they'll just get worse and those same people will think that they can just walk all over you. Somethings you have to nip immediately, before they grow into something too savage to handle.
The quote that stood out to me the most came from Martin Luther King. With the mob approaching outside he said "Alabama will have to face the fact we're determined to be free." This quote was so down-to-earth and realistic to their situation. He literally said what every black person in Alabama at the time was thinking; we will be free, we will be accepted.
The sit-in protests stood the most out to me, because they were such a direct and straightforward way of fighting back. They sat in places that refused to serve them, so they had to have a strong will to be able to look these racist people in their eyes and refuse to leave. I for one don't know if I could do it, seems like a lot of stress and expectations were placed on these people who volunteered to participate in the sit-ins.

Exploration 7 by Jared Gandelot

After watching Ain't Scared of Your Jails, I learned that the fight for civil rights was long and bloody, and that it required resilience and determination. We can apply the strategies that they used to bring about change in society today. As the fight for rights continues, we should look back to see what was most effective, such as the sit-ins at down town Nashville dinners. This peaceful protest pointed out an issue that was being ignored. This direct action lead to change, but it was slow. The parents boycotted the down town area. This economic stress brought about violence, peaking on April 19th when dynamite blew up a councilman's home. The students resiliently marched after the violence. This resilience is what made their tactics so successful.
Two quotes that really stood out to me were made by Leo Lillard and by Mayor Ben West. The first was made by Leo when he was a child and asked his mother about the segregated water fountains. "Mother, what's the reason? Why are there two names up there and the water is exactly the same?" Seeing the issue of segregation through a child's eyes allows you to under stand how it affected someone from a young age. The second quote made by Mayor Ben West was an answer to an question by a student protester. "... I could not agree that it was morally right for someone to sell them merchandise and refuse them services." Although he did not out right say it, he thought segregation was morally wrong. Him saying that was really meaning at that time and lead to change in Nashville.
The determination and resilience of the students continued in the freedom rides. The push back was much greater and violence was every where. These students were willing to risk their lives to bring about change. Even when they were taken to jail it seemed like nothing could stop them from creating change.

Exploration 7: AIn't Scared of Your Jail

     The biggest thing that I learned from this documentary is that fundamental change is always difficult. Instituting a societal change not only takes extensive push but patience and time, and you have to be stubborn but leave breathing room to allow the change to push onto the rest of the society. The reason we call it change is because it is changing the dynamic of what people are accustomed to and those who are the voiceless are making their own voice to get people to have an epiphany and empower an imperative movement, and knowing people will fight you on it only continues that empowerment but to not give up.
      Watching this documentary showed us how to recognize a problem and approach it with the right attitude and to follow through with your beliefs regardless of what others think. The statistic that goes along with that and really surprised me was how many people were arrested during the Freedom Rides, over 300 people were arrested in response to that and it showed the fight back against the civil rights movement and taught us that the resistance was real.
     The quote that really got me was when the man was attesting to the movements and the bus rides, saying, "people were yelling kill the n*****... All I was doing was riding the bus" and this was so sad because it is hard for us as human beings to fathom that we see people hate others solely due to the color of the skin but it is a real problem. Martin Luther King also proclaimed "Alabama is going to have to face the fact we are determined to be free", which really spoke to the way he fought for civil rights that it was with stubbornness and recognizing the right thing but never in a demeanor to provoke violence.
     The protest that stood out to me was the sit-ins because it was a more direct way of protest than the others, meaning that people were sitting in places that refused to serve them and sat anyways, obviously provoking verbal and physical response not just by management of the businesses but customers in the place and this was extremely symbolic because it was bold and brash and showed great integrity.

Ain't Scared of Your Jails by Catelyn Millet

The biggest thing I learned from Ain't Scared of Your Jails is that even though they would get beat up and put in jail, they continued to fight for what they believe in. We can use what we learned in this film to continue to fight for discrimination that is still happening today. The young students risked being put in jail so they could live a life that is equal. Mrs. Alice Walker's son was one of the many students thrown in jail because of the sit-ins. He called his mom and just continued to say, "Be cool mom, be cool." This quote stuck out to me because her son continued to still be calm even though he was thrown in jail. From a couple little sit-ins in Nashville, the sit-ins spread to 69 cities and 2000 people were arrested. After the sit-ins, they eventually refused to go to stores and eventually they had a big march that consisted of 4000 people that continued to fight for blacks to be free.
Along with the sit-ins, refusing to go to stores, and the big march, they also started the Freedom Riders. Freedom Riders were an interracial group. They traveled to spread their fight for equality. On May 14th, they took two buses from Atlanta and headed to Birmingham. On the way there the first bus was bombed and twelve people were hospitalized and the second bus was met by an angry mob. The freedom riders were met with violence but they still continued to fight for what they believed in. They eventually got on Greyhound buses and continued their journey to Birmingham. John Patterson, the governor of Alabama made sure that they were protected on their travel because John F. Kennedy got a hold of him. After about 40 miles into the journey, the protection was gone.
When they reached Alabama, they were met with a group of angry white people that beat some of the freedom riders. Also while in Alabama, Martin Luther King Junior flew in to lead a rally. They were in a church and they could all hear the angry mob outside. While in the church listening to the mob outside, Martin Luther King Junior said, "Alabama will have to face the fact that we are determined to be free". This was such a bold quote that he made. It shows that they will continue to fight no matter what is thrown at them.
     The biggest thing I learned from watching *Aint Scared of Your Jails* is that no matter what forces try and stop or prevent the movement, if it is honestly what is for the better world it is going to happen and eventually the naysayers will be left in small numbers compared to those who acknowledge what is right. This is proven in different ways for the civil rights movement it happened with nonviolence, with the Holocaust it happened through war, and currently with the LGBT community it happened with love. They all have one side that initially most people thought to be correct and because it was taboo to think otherwise went along with it for a period of time, until groups of people who saw a big problem started to voice their opinions and one way or another got the views out to other people and it spread like wild fire. Now its to the point where we as a nation know you can't treat people differently because the color of their skin, their religion, or their sexual preferences, how we got there took different amounts of time and effort but what was better for the world and us as people came through in the end.
     The main tactic used to spread awareness throughout the film is non-violence in everything they did. Marches, the Freedom Trail, sit-ins, not reacting to being physically assaulted, boycotting, and so on all of these things happened without violences from the African American people because they didn't want what they were fighting for to be tarnished by a bad reputation of "the blacks fighting our people" or "We MUST stay separated because blacks don't know how to act" and even though most of the southern white people at the time where acting terribly at the time that wasn't perceived as a problem, it was normal or okay for that to be happening. Those in support of the civil rights movement understood that and I think the person who summed it up best was Alice Walker's son when he was being throw in jail and he told her "be cool mother, be cool." That to me is the epitome of what the civil rights movement supports had to do, to keep what they were fighting so hard for from getting off track.
     This ties into todays society because like I said before we know now after having to go through very terrible times that you can't judge or treat people differently because they look, believe things, or love people differently than you. Majority of people in America would think a person is crazy if they said there should be separation by color, but not very long ago that was normal. Its still very new for a lot of people, but now turning away a couple wanting to getting married is illegal based on their sexual preference. I think the struggle now is faced by muslims in America trying to get that stigma of 9/11 and current issues away from their culture.

Monday, November 30, 2015

Exploration 7 - Nick Reed

When watching Ain't Scared of Your Jails, the big picture that was displayed predominantly throughout the play was that persistence while fighting for a cause will usually end in triumph. In today's society, we often see situations where an organized group of people are unable to make a lasting impact because of their inconsistencies in practice or value of the work that is being preformed. During the civil rights movement of the 60's one had to be thorough with their practice against social resistance and had to show persistence in order to actually make a change .

Something that allowed them to continue to be persistent in their actions toward social equality was the way they were able to non-violently act upon their purpose, even when receiving nothing but violent rebuttals instead. In one of the scenes, a gentleman was arrested for being part of the sit-ins in Nashville and was heard telling his mother to, "be cool, mother, be cool". His attitude toward the situation was one of optimism and pride as he calmly got arrested on that afternoon in Nashville.

A tactic that the film used was old and original documentations of the events happening during the civil rights era. It all myself as the viewer to get a better look at how and what actually was going on in the sit-ins as well as a well provided explanation of the events taking place. It allowed me to connect to the film and be more immersed in the history of it.

Exploration 7: Natalee Christman

The number one thing I learned from the film Ain't Scared of Your jails is that segregation and hate crimes were not only in small southern communities. They were also in large metropolitan cities such as Nashville Tennessee. I believe that this information still pertains to todays society. We can look at the attacks that are happening in to minorities in large cities such as the African Americans in Chicago and also the police. Both of these groups are minorities in todays society and they both are involved in crimes that are related to their ethnicity and to their employment.
  One Statistic from the film that really stood out to me was that of 300 freedom riders were arrested in the state of Mississippi. I know that they were arrested to keep them safe but, I found this to be very upsetting. These people were just trying to gain freedom and they were doing it peacefully. I also find this to be extremely wasteful with money on Mississippi's behalf. Tax payers money was paying to keep the freedom riders and the riders had not done anything wrong. One quote that really stood out to me was "Alabama will have to face the fact that we are determined to be free"-MLK. I thought this quote was very effective because Alabama did face the fact that they were going to be free and they protected the protesters. I also thought that it was nice because it was said by a very influential person, Martin Luther King Jr. during a sermon in Alabama and the national guard was protecting the church. Another quote that really stood out to me was "Im taking a ride on the Greyhound bus line, Im a riding from seat to Jackson this time. Hallelujah Im a traveling, hallelujah aint it fine, hallelujah Im a traveling down freedoms main line"- James Farmer. This was a song that freedom riders sang when they were on their way to Jackson Mississippi. I thought that this song just showed the accomplishment of the freedom riders and how happy they were with themselves.
  One way of protesting to me that really stood out was the Freedom Rides. I thought that this was the most effective way to protest because the bus was always moving and the word was always spreading. With the Sit-ins they protesters were only able to go to a couple lunch counters a day with the freedom rides they could go through multiple states in a day. Also the Freedom Rides resulted in Alabama protecting the riders and this was a big step.

Exploration 7: Morgan DeWitt

What I learned from "Ain't Scared of Your Jails" is social change and the transformation of culture over time can be beautiful. The process of getting over the hump of segregation, racism, and prejudice wasn't so pretty but what came after is something that can still be admired today. It wasn't right away that blacks and whites could sit together and enjoy a meal without conflict but gradually people began to see each other for who they really are instead of the color of their skin. It reminded me of the quote from Remember the Titans, "The world learned to trust a mans soul, not the look of him."

I had a few favorite quotes from the documentary. When one of the very important freedom riders, John Lewis, talked about his last meal before one of the most important rides of history in 1961 I could not help but laugh at his humor. He explained, "It was my first time having Chinese food and it was like the last supper." It was also crazy to think that this was the freedom riders first time being somewhere they could have Chinese food.

Another scene I really enjoyed was when Alice Walker's son was put into jail for disorderly conduct after one of the protests. Alice Walker said she remembered talking to her son from jail and all he had to say was, "Be cool, Mom." I absolutely loved this scene because it showed how dedicated the protesters were to there cause and they really could handle anything.

The tactic I admired the most was the forming of organization. I thought this was the most powerful because they had a organized group of people with a goal in front of them. I thought SNCC (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee) rung true to their name and reached their goal in a powerful way. After the protests had reached 69 cities and 2,000 had been arrested organization was needed to take things to the next level. SNCC stayed around for a long time after the freedom rides had came to halt also.

Sunday, November 29, 2015

Exploration 7- Brianna Moore

      When watch Ain't Scared of Your Jails I learned how hard the black community had to work in order to get the freedoms that we take for granted, these freedoms and rights that we expect and demand on a daily bases. We can us this knowledge to not let history repeat itself and to stand together instead of driving a stake between gender, race, sexuality. It shows that if we work together instead of fighting to keep it separated that we stand together in order to bring us together as a nation. "Racial issues continued to tear the city apart." These issues were putting the towns against each other. Some were fighting for the city to stay segregated because that was all they ever knew while others were fighting for their own freedoms.

        During this time period in 69 different cites  from Greensboro to San Antonio more than 2,000 people were arrested for participating in sit ins in which they were fighting for the rights that we took for granted, fighting for simple rights, like when Leo Lillard was a boy and drank from the white water fountain and then drank from the colored water fountain. He said "Taste the same to me mom." They were fighting for the freedom to go wherever they pleased and for the right to drink out of the same water fountain as the whites. These people were arrested for fighting for rights they should have had all along.

During the 1950s the black community had many tactics that they used in order to get the racial equality that they were fighting for. First they participated in the sit-ins in 69 different cities, then they did the economic protests where they did not buy from the stores in downtown Nashville, and the chain stores that discriminated in the south were picketed in the north. Next they did the march, then the SNCE, and CORE, and finally the freedom rides. The one that I thought was the most effective would have to be the freedom rides, because even when everything and everyone was against them they did not give up. Jim Zwerg said "those of us who are on the Freedom Ride, we will continue the Freedom Ride. I'm not sure if I'll be able to, but we're going to New Orleans no matter what happens. We're dedicated to this, we'll take hitting, we'll take beating. We're willing to accept death. But we're going to keep coming until we can ride anywhere in the south to any place else in the south. Without anybody making any comments, just as American citizens."